Eye Disease Diagnosis & Management in Regina & Grenfell

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Detecting & Diagnosing Eye Disease

Eye exams are an important tool for the early diagnosis of eye disease. Many eye diseases progress slowly, with no pain or symptoms, and by the time you notice any vision changes, it can be too late.

Early identification is crucial for treating and managing eye diseases. If your optometrist is able to make a diagnosis in the beginning stages, there is a higher chance of slowing the progression of a disease and preventing vision loss.

Regular, comprehensive eye exams help your optometrist monitor changes to your vision over time. Year-over-year imaging and assessment can highlight the small changes that may indicate the development of an eye disease. 

To learn more about the equipment we use to assess your eyes, visit the Our Technology page.

Advancements in Eye Care Come Standard Here

We offer the AdaptDx diagnostic tool to test for age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

At Advance Eye Care Center, we’re now including AMD testing with AdaptDx as a standard in all our eye exams for:

AdaptDx accurately and comfortably measures dark adaptation of the eye—how quickly the eye regains its sensitivity to the dark after exposure to bright lights.

Since poor night vision is one of the earliest signs of AMD, the AdaptDx can uncover the possibility of AMD before it can cause irreversible damage, significantly improving patient outcomes.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases generally characterized by damage to the optic nerve, usually due to high intraocular pressure. 

Pressure builds up inside the eye, damaging the optic nerve and causing irreversible vision loss. Often, the progression of glaucoma is slow and symptom-free, so regular, comprehensive eye exams are key to detecting this disease.

Types of Glaucoma

Open-Angle: Fluid buildup caused by blockage of the eye’s drainage channels can increase intraocular pressure (IOP) and cause open-angle glaucoma. Generally, peripheral vision is the first thing impacted, followed by central vision.

Angle-Closure: Angle-closure glaucoma occurs when the space between the iris and cornea narrows, trapping fluid in the eye. When the pressure rises as a result of this fluid, angle-closure glaucoma occurs. There are two subgroups of angle-closure glaucoma—acute (sudden onset) and chronic (gradual progression).  Acute angle-closure glaucoma is a medical emergency.

Secondary: Secondary glaucoma occurs when rising intraocular pressure is caused by eye trauma, injury, or infection.

Normal-Tension: When the optic nerve is damaged, but intraocular pressure remains within normal range, normal-tension glaucoma may be the cause.

Generally, glaucoma impacts your peripheral vision first. Patchy or blind spots in your field of vision may appear in the early stages, followed by tunnel vision in the more advanced stages.

Symptoms of acute angle-closure glaucoma include sudden onset headaches, blurry vision, eye redness, or halos appearing around lights. If you experience any of these symptoms, you should call your optometrist immediately.

Glaucoma risk factors may include:

  • Being over the age of 60
  • Having a family history of glaucoma
  • Diabetes or heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Corticosteroid use
  • Previous trauma to the eyes

Using eye protection to prevent trauma and keeping up healthy lifestyle habits are important tools for preventing glaucoma.

There are several treatments for glaucoma, gradually increasing in their level of invasiveness. Most treatment methods are aimed at bringing down the intraocular pressure. Prescription eye drops, drainage implants, and several types of surgery are all available, depending on your particular situation.

It is important to note that there is no cure for glaucoma. Prevention and early diagnosis through regular eye exams are critical.

Cataracts

When the clear lens of your eye hardens, forms a cloudy buildup, and becomes opaque, this is called a cataract. Many people live with cataracts, but in their advanced stages, they may obscure vision and make performing daily tasks very difficult. 

Cataracts often develop without pain, but the following symptoms may indicate their formation:

  • Halos around lights
  • Foggy or blurry vision
  • Light sensitivity
  • Dull, muted colours

The following factors may increase your risk of developing cataracts:

  • Aging
  • Sun exposure
  • High blood pressure
  • Previous eye injury
  • Smoking
  • Previous eye surgery

Eating a diet high in vitamins C and E, smoking cessation, and protecting your eyes from UV rays may help prevent the development of cataracts.

Glasses and contact lenses can clear up mild vision loss due to cataracts. But, if the condition is in an advanced stage, cataract surgery may be the only option to restore your sight.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) occurs when the macula deteriorates. This condition damages your central vision, the part of your vision that enables you to drive, read, and recognize faces. Loss of vision in this area can create a serious impediment to your day-to-day tasks.

Dry

Dry AMD is the most common type of AMD, accounting for the majority of cases. It occurs when parts of the macula become thinner due to aging and accumulate tiny clumps of protein.

Wet

There are fewer overall cases of wet AMD, yet this type is responsible for the majority of cases of blindness as a result of AMD. Wet AMD occurs when blood vessels grow under the retina, burst, and leak fluid into the macula.

The telltale signs of age-related macular degeneration are blurry spots in the central vision as well as straight lines that appear wavy or curved.

Factors that may increase your risk of developing age-related macular degeneration include:

  • UV exposure
  • Aging
  • High blood pressure
  • Family history of AMD
  • Smoking

Cessation of smoking and using sun protection can help prevent the development of AMD.

Laser therapy and injectable medications may be able to treat wet AMD. Your optometrist can evaluate your eyes and provide a recommendation.

Diabetic Eye Diseases 

People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing eye diseases. Serious complications like diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema can develop, permanently damaging your vision.

To learn more about these and how we can assist, please visit our diabetic eye exams page.

Keep Your Eyes Healthy

Comprehensive eye exams are crucial for your vision health. Book an appointment at Advance Eye Care Center today!

OUR LOCATIONS

AECC Regina

  • 3617B Pasqua Street
  • Regina, SK S4S 6W8

*in July and August we are closed on Saturdays and open 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM on Thursdays

AECC Grenfell

  • 721 Stella Street
  • Grenfell, SK S0G 2B0

Our Blog

Why Do My Eyes Feel Strained When Wearing Contacts?

Eye Strain, Glasses & Contact Lenses

Eye strain is common for many people, especially when wearing contact lenses. You can experience eye strain when wearing contacts for many reasons, including digital eye strain. If eye strain is a common experience for you, what’s the possible cause?  Continue reading to learn more about eye strain, including what it is and what can […]

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November 7, 2022
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How Do Corrective Lenses Help Myopia?

Children’s Eye Care, Eye Conditions & Treatments

Myopia is the most common cause of distance refractive errors worldwide. Due to the rise in myopia prevalence over the past few decades and the sight-threatening issues associated with extreme myopia, such as cataracts, and glaucoma myopia has become a significant public health concern. This leaves people looking for ways to reduce symptoms. Myopia, also […]

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September 15, 2022
Myles Bokinac

What Is a Contact Lens Fitting?

Glasses & Contact Lenses

Your eyes are unique, and that means they require careful and dedicated care. A comprehensive contact lens exam isn’t complete without your optometrist conducting a contact lens fitting to get a comfortable and precise fit for your new contacts. Let’s explore the contact lens fitting process, what to expect, and how it benefits your vision. […]

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September 15, 2022
Myles Bokinac
A woman sitting at her desk her with her down in her hand due to eye strain and pain

Eye strain is common for many people, especially when wearing contact lenses. You can experience eye strain when wearing contacts for many reasons, including digital eye strain. If eye strain is a common experience for you, what’s the possible cause?  Continue reading to learn more about eye strain, including what it is and what can […]

Read More…

A young boy smiling and holding onto the side of his glasses

Myopia is the most common cause of distance refractive errors worldwide. Due to the rise in myopia prevalence over the past few decades and the sight-threatening issues associated with extreme myopia, such as cataracts, and glaucoma myopia has become a significant public health concern. This leaves people looking for ways to reduce symptoms. Myopia, also […]

Read More…

A female optician talks about contact lenses with a female patient

Your eyes are unique, and that means they require careful and dedicated care. A comprehensive contact lens exam isn’t complete without your optometrist conducting a contact lens fitting to get a comfortable and precise fit for your new contacts. Let’s explore the contact lens fitting process, what to expect, and how it benefits your vision. […]

Read More…

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